Public transport

No for women-only coaches

1/26/2011 Matt Siow 9 Comments

I am here to stress that I and most men against the implementation of women-only coaches by KTM Komuter since April last year.

Reasons to justify my claims are;
1: Low patronage' of women-only coaches by women during 'Peak Hours'.

That is the fact which we should not denied, if you have even experience it. Take aback my experience at KL Sentral, Mid Valley and Bandar Tasik Selatan before, when the komuter approaches what you expect those women commuters? They just rush to all over doors of coaches (regardless of it is women-only coaches). And they are very smart, leaving their 'precious' coach less crowded for their own comfort, while the 1st and 3rd coach was congested with passengers until jostling and door fail closed.

If that's the case, the purpose of women-only coaches has already been defeated. We men are not looking for 'victims' or to harass women.

2: Human rights and freedom of movement falls apart

Having this women-only coaches will definitely suppress our human rights and freedom of movement. How?

Islamic countries like Iran, Saudi Arabia and UAE always practice gender inequality between men and women. They have special lanes/paths separating men and women in most aspects (i.e public transport). Putting this concept back to a multi-racial country sounds ridiculed, What is worrying is that there may be separate queues, shops, cinemas and other public space for men and women in the future.

This may also lead one to think that separating women from men is the way to stop sexual harassment.

This is further concreted by introduction of Rapid Lady Bus in December last year.

Now women-only coaches draw flak from men, have a look what men says:

Female-only coaches draw flak from men (The Star)

Thursday January 27, 2011

Oblivious to his surrounding: A man boarding the women’s coach.

WHILE the move to have women-only coaches on KTM Komuter is welcomed by the fairer sex to save them from jostling with men in packed trains, it drew flak from men.

A reader named Kugan commented the move was against the spirit of gender equality, and it was discrimination against men.

He said if one of the three coaches of the train had been reserved for women, they should not be allowed to enter the other coaches.

“Why didn’t this article report that women are also seen in other coaches where men are allowed? So women can go into the general coaches but men cannot enter the ‘women’s coach’, isn’t this a discrimination against men?

“We are talking about public transportation here, shouldn’t the facilities be shared regardless of gender or type of people?” he asked.

He also questioned if the ruling had really improved KTM’s service, adding that auxiliary policemen stationed at the platforms did not have the legal right to ask men to leave the women’s coach.

Another reader, police officer P. Nalusamy, 55, commented that the ruling was a bane for male commuters travelling on the overcrowded trains.

“I understand that it is a good move to protect women, but since the middle coach is reserved for them, why are they still rushing into the two other coaches? The front and back coaches are jam-packed!” he commented.

He said the move had worsened the train service. “We have to bear with overcrowding, waiting under the hot sun for the trains and now female commuters racing with us to use the two remaining coaches,” he added.

Abdus Fauzi, who studies in Sarawak, said his friends were also not aware of the women-only ruling even though they were regular Komuter users.


“I also find that the signage is not practical enough. I can barely make out from afar what the logo means. If someone is rushing, he is definitely going to step into the wrong compartment.

He pointed out that male passengers were limited to two coaches but women could enter all three coaches. “Sometimes, when they need to rush to their destination, the men will just have to be shameless and ride the women-only coach,” he said.

Metzelder says: The move by KTM Komuter is unpractical at all and is leveling a discrimination towards men. I see that the 'only' reasons women can convince to have this is surveys had shown that women constituted 60% of KTM commuters.

And what futher annoying is KTM are waiting for the authorities’ approval to impose a fine on those violating the ruling. No to women-only coaches unless we get 4 coach train in near future.

Obviously Malaysians seldom read the signage and its not attractive to catch eye of people. While there were regular public service announcements at the stations reminding commuters that the middle coach was reserved for women but only in Bahasa, without taking account of English, the international language.

To conclude, we men are not in favor with the move, and gender discrimination have to be stopped. Or KTM Komuter will risk to lose men commuters support in time.

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9 comments:

  1. what a nice article... it's true though..


    I'll follow you... hope you'll do the same

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  2. @Archaqx Yeah, same thoughts with me bro.

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  3. Luckily Sg do not have this~

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  4. @Kel SG does not need this as even during peak hours, the MRT will not be packed until full.

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  5. I used to travel to Rawang from KL Sentral to visit my Grandma there. I have always enjoyed my ride. Some time December, I went back to visit my Grandma. Not realising what was happening, I entered the particular coach because it looked empty, sat down and got stared at by the women. Then, one of them reminded me that the coach was for women only.

    I was stunned and dumbfounded because I have never heard of such policy but to avoid embarrassment, I moved to another coach...

    Frankly, I do not think such initiative is viable while I understand the rationale for having it. But seriously, I think it is ridiculous because of the build-up of crowd in other coaches eventually that makes travelling in Komuter, a great inconvenience...

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  6. @mistarJ - Exactly it happens to others as well, reducing the overload capacity during peak hours will solve it better.

    Still it was said 140-160% overcapacity during a time.

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  7. I believe it all started when there was a rise in molestation against female passengers. Could you please perhaps suggest an alternative solution to that problem?

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  8. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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